Seoul Food: Noryangjin Fish Market

IMG_0017IMG_0043The Noryangjin Fish Market is one of Seoul’s top sites. A huge warehouse filled with seafood, the wholesale market attracts locals and tourists alike. We walked around the market, noting the exotic species available (such as the giant octopi above) and then headed upstairs to one of the restaurants on the second floor.

We chose our restaurant based on how many Koreans we saw inside. The easy way to check is to see how many shoes are outside (Koreans take off their shoes before entering a traditional restaurant, where you sit on the ground).We ordered the set menu for two people although we were three. It was definitely the right choice. We were served so many courses of seafood we couldn’t finish. IMG_0057

BanChan

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A platter of assorted seafood, including shrimp, sea snails, and something that we think was some kind of bloom clam or oyster. It was interesting.IMG_0084

A platter of fresh sashimi. The platter was divided by different parts of the fish, which had vastly different textures.IMG_0086

 

Some Sushi.IMG_0074

Grilled Mackerel.IMG_0079

Corn.

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Egg-battered oysters.

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Clams.IMG_0087

Shrimp Tempura.IMG_0099

Fish Bone Soup.

 

Noryangjin Fisheries Wholesale Market

South Korea, 서울특별시 동작구 노량진동 13-8

13-8 Noryangjin-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul, South Korea

SPQR: The Last Supper

It’s been exactly a month since I’ve relocated from the West to the East Coast. A month since I’ve tasted any food from San Francisco. A month of college food. But it hasn’t been a bad month at all, just a busy month – hence the lack of any activity on this blog.

I do miss my city by the bay, its weather, and its food. So on the anniversary of my relocation, I am nostalgically looking back on my last meal in San Francisco.

My last dining experience in San Francisco was bittersweet (literally). My parents took me out to SPQR the night before my 6 AM flight and we ate our hearts content. SPQR was fabulous. The portions are small, and the prices – well, not small. SPQR highlights seafood caught by one local fisherman. The dishes depend on the supply, which means they are often atypical to what you may find in any other restaurant. The restaurant is beautiful design-wise. The skylights above add a nice glow to the restaurant and make for great photography. Although the restaurant and their prices may seem a bit pretentious, there is something incredibly charming about SPQR, where the quarters are so tight that you can watch the chef chat with customers as he prepares food from your seat. I want nothing more to have a seat at the bar – saved for neighborhood regulars, friends of the chef, and people in the biz (the restaurant and food business, that is).

And finally, here’s what we ate:

“fritto misto’, pesce, eggplant, squash, squid and its ink with smoked chilli

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chicken liver mousse, peach fennel marmellata and balsamic gelatina

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complements of the chef…

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octopus, opal basil, panissa, green chickpea, cucumber and american ham

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monkeyfaced eel, smoked plum, horseradish crisp, plankton – too many different ingredients on one board, so little time.

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lobster tortelli, nantes carrot, lobster brodo and garden herb

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“pyramidi al fungi”, chanterelle mushroom fonduta, espresso rubbed cheese and summer truffle – not my favorite dish, it was far less complex or interesting than the other dishes.

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guinea hen cappelletti, sundried tomato, burrata, cavalo nero and red wine

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smoked fettucini, sea urchin, smoked bacon and soft quail egg – this was by far the best dish. It was amazing. A new twist on what could have been a simple carbonera. All of the ingredients fit the right flavors but added more – a hint of exoticism, a creamier texture, etc.

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And DESSERT! At this point, I can’t remember exactly what we had. But don’t they look great?!?

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For those of you still blessed with living in or near San Francisco, I suggest you get to work on securing a seat at the bar at SPQR.

SPQR
1911 Fillmore St.

San Francisco, CA 94115

(415)771-7779

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